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Congress tome published

May 2010 – The congress proceedings of the Conference “Universities und Schools in international Discussion: Opportunities and Risks in Present-Day Development” has been published bySchneider Hohengehren. The editors are: Olga Graumann, Mikhail Pevzner, Margitta Rudolph, Irina Diel.


Olga Graumann, Mikhail Pevzner, Margitta Rudolph, Irina Diel (2010):

Universities und Schools in international Discussion: Opportunities and Risks in Present-Day Development

Contents:

Today, the International dialogue of the education sector is as important as ever. Schools and Universities are responsible for the education of future generations who, in a globalised world, can no longer develop only within their national mindset but must integrate with international perspectives.

At the International Academy for the Humanisation of Education (IAHE) congress which took place at the University of Hildesheim in March 2009, scientists from 11 East and West European countries discussed development tendencies and trends as well as chances and risks of different education systems.

In the last ten years, the Bologna-Process has led to immense momentum and made lasting changes in Universities as well as schools. In the previous meeting The Bologna-Process was critically assessed by East and West European scientists focusing on aspects of education; upbringing; socialisation; teaching and learning processes; institution; organisation; University and school management. The effects of these changes on upbringing, values, migration, individual and research learning are analysed in these contributions.

Foreword

 

The development of globalisation in the past few decades has also had an effect on the field of education. Already countries can no longer make decisions within the education sector without thinking globally and keeping up with other countries.

 

At the International Academy for the Humanisation of Education (IAHE) congress which took place at the University of Hildesheim in March 2009, scientists from 11 East and West European countries discussed development tendencies and trends as well as chances and risks of the different education systems. The IAHE was founded in 1995 at which time it set itself the goal of exchanging reform ideas of the last decades in East and West under the paradigm of the humanisation of education. Meanwhile the Bologna-Process, which in the last ten years has led to immense momentum and made lasting changes in Universities as well as schools, created a common basis for Eastern and Western European countries which needs to be critically assessed.

 

The congress proceeding is divided into four main chapters:

 

I.  New perspectives from a political and educational view. This begins with a historic-political retrospective analysis of the convergence of East and West through overcoming the Cold War in Europe and shows how subsequently universities and schools in Russia, Germany and Latvia reacted or might react to the change.

 

II. Changes in Education, Upbringing, Socialisation. The social value systems and social orientation are in a constant state of change which universities and schools constantly need to adjust to. Therefore upbringing is just as important as expanding intellectual abilities. The changes and intensification of migration affects all countries by now. The contributions from different countries expose problems but also solutions.

 

III. Changes in teaching and learning processes. All educationalists agree that specifically in teacher training under democratic structures in universities, new ways of teaching and learning, which allow individual learning, research learning and individual encouragement, must be explored.

 

IV. Changes in Institution, Organisation and Management. In the educationalists’ analysis it becomes clear that the Bologna-Process brings with it numerous dangers but can also be seen as a positive system changing factor. The use of business principles and standardised tests was unanimously criticised.

 

The international Dialogue must be continued because schools and universities are significantly responsible for the education of future generations. This will no longer develop only within the national mindset but must integrate international perspectives. We thank all authors for their collaboration with the IAHE in this congress proceedings report as well as Dr. Hella Barlage, Natalia Krjksunova and David Whybra for revising the contents and editing.